Both children and their divorced or separated parents may find the holiday season difficult to navigate. Children that are bouncing between households may not really understand a schedule that is dictated by a prearranged parenting agreement, and their parents may still be coming to grips with the effects that the divorce has had in almost every facet of their lives. Transitioning families in Minnesota and elsewhere that are grappling with changes to their holiday traditions may find value in a few tips designed to help them better weather the season.

Single parents that plan to be with their children over the holidays may find it beneficial to put the kids and their need for happiness and security first. Spending time together and beginning new holiday traditions that everyone can enjoy will create memories that the kids may cherish for years to come. Parents should avoid using the holidays to get back at their former spouses in any way. Outspending the other parent, being inflexible about the holiday schedule or bad-mouthing the ex may only make the holidays more difficult for the kids than they otherwise might be.

Parents that are spending the holidays on their own might best help their children by handling the situation in an upbeat manner. Celebrating with family and friends may work out better than being alone, and the children may ultimately benefit from the positive example. These single parents may also do well to avoid attempting to compensate for their absence with toys and gizmos that break the budget. This doesn’t really help as the gifting-spree may be more about the parent’s need for reassurance and forgiveness than it is about the kids.

In spite of their best efforts, some divorcing or separated parents may find it difficult to establish a workable holiday schedule. A lawyer that is experienced in the areas of divorce and child visitation may be able to help a parent negotiate an agreement that might work well for all.