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Family Law Archives

What happens to child support if a parent becomes disabled

Many Minnesota parents who have custody of their children rely on child support to make ends meet. However, the other parent could potentially become disabled, making it more difficult for them to make the child support payments that they owe. If a custodial parent suddenly finds that the other parent has become disabled, there are several questions that need to be addressed.

Advice for a Smooth and Successful Step-Parent Adoption

Just because someone goes through a divorce does not mean that they will never find marriage again. In fact, many people who get divorced look to get remarried. When someone gets remarried to someone with children, they often worry about how they will be received by the children. After all, marrying someone with kids requires being accepted by the children as well.

The value of child support in Minnesota

The goal of child support is to ensure that single parents are able to provide for their children. In spite of the fact that the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement collects billions of dollars in support payments each year, a very large percentage of parents are not receiving the child support they are owed. According to data from the 2016 U.S. Census Bureau, about 67 percent of single mothers receive what they are owed, compared to nearly 75 percent of single fathers.

Child support rule may keep incarcerated parents out of debt

For Minnesota parents who become incarcerated, paying child support when they no longer earn an income can have detrimental effects on their ability to stay out of poverty. In some cases, parents find themselves heading back to jail because they do not have the financial ability to pay back their child support debt.

Past-due child support after the child turns 18

Minnesota parents who are owed child support might struggle to collect it. This struggle might continue even after the child is no longer a minor. Parents who fall into arrears still must pay past-due child support even if they no longer are currently obligated under the order because of the child's reaching the cut-off age.

Negotiating divorce terms calmly can yield benefits

In the heat of divorce negotiations, emotions can run hot. This is not surprising as a divorce is typically the culmination of intense and long-standing differences. As such, it's all too easy for a divorcing person to act in ways designed to make life as difficult as possible for his or her soon-to-be ex-spouse. But as tempting as it may be to keep the fires of conflict burning, your best play is to make your settlement negotiations as amicable as possible.

Grandparents may be denied the right to spoil their grandchildren

Divorce tears everyone's world apart, literally and figuratively. Battles over property, finances and retirement funds can rage on for months, and sometimes even years. Parents may find themselves fighting over custody, where the children will spend their holidays and who pays for orthodontic work and school fees. The children may find themselves caught in the crossfire, and friends and family may feel uncomfortable weighing in on every issue.  Grandparents, sometimes the best stabilizing force for the children around, may be left out in the cold.

How orders for protection work in Minnesota

It is a sad fact that many Minnesotans are not safe in their own homes. Their spouse or partner regularly threatens and abuses them physically, sexually or both. This perversion of love and marriage has no place in society, and when victims make the often-difficult decision to get out, the law can help protect them from their abusers.

Marvin Law Office, L.L.C.

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Marvin Law Office, L.L.C.
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Anoka, MN 55303

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